Anarchy 6

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Contents of No. 6

August 1961


A future for the cinema? Ward Jackson 161
The anarchism of Jean Vigo John Ellerby 163
Making ‘Circus at Clopton Hall’ Annie Mygind 174
The animated film grows up Philip Sansom 179
Making ‘The Little Island’ Dick Williams 181
Luis Buñuel: reality and illlusion Rufus Segar 183
Another look at Buñuel Tristram Shandy 186
The innocent eye of Robert Flaherty C. 190
Drawings by: Rufus Segar, Dick Williams and Denis Lowson.


THE TRAGEDY OF AFRICA


This is the title of the tenth and latest annual volume of reprinted articles from the anarchist weekly Freedom. As in previous years, the title was chosen from among those of the hundred-and-two articles in this 253-page, 100,000-word volume, and among the African topics discussed are the boycott, Sharpeville, the attempt by David Pratt on the life of Dr. Verwoerd, and the wars in Algeria and the Congo.

Other overseas affairs include Cuba, the Cold War, the U-2 incident, the coup d’etat in Turkey, Franco, and the world food situation.

Reports on the anti-bomb campaign include anarchist views on the Harrington, Foulness and Aldermaston demonstrations, the Scarborough conference and the French nuclear bomb.

The fifteen articles on industrial affairs include discussion on transport as a business or a service, the crisis in the motor industry, and a long study of the situation of apprenticeship.

Take-over bids, the possibilities of local radio, capital punishment, flogging, the Carlton approved school riot, and the battle of St. Pancras are among the home affairs in the volume, and there are several articles on the crisis in the Labour Party.

Radical views on sexual behaviour are expressed in the articles on the birth control pill, artificial insemination, the sexual needs of youth and hypocrisy about venereal disease.

In fact the book contains something about practically everything, from an appreciation of Albert Camus to a debunking of the Siege of Sydney Street, and from a study of class, status and power in America to a passionate defence of Lady Chatterley.

If you enjoy the volume, there are nine previous ones still available, covering the years 1951 to 1959 (and if you are a subscriber to Freedom you can get them for the reduced price of five shillings each).


Selections from FREEDOM
Volume 10, 1960
paperback 7s. 6d.; clothbound 10s. 6d.

FREEDOM PRESS

Printed by Express Printers, London, E.1.


Subscribe to ANARCHY

single copies 1s. 8d. (30c.) post free: 12 issues 19s. ($3)

and to FREEDOM

readers of ANARCHY will find FREEDOM, the anarchist weekly, indispensable. A year’s subscription to both journals is offered at 30s. ($5).

Cheques, POs and Money Orders should be made out to:

FREEDOM PRESS

17a Maxwell Road London SW6 England,  Tel: RENown 3736


ANARCHY 1: Rescuing Galbraith from the conventional wisdom; Sex-and-Violence and the origin of the novel (Alex Comfort) Education, equality, opportunity (John Ellerby) The ‘new wave’ in Britain (Nicolas Walter).

ANARCHY 2: Workers’ Control: Looking for a movement; Approaches to industrial democracy (Geoffrey Ostergaard) The gang system in Coventry (Reg Wright) Workers’ control in the building industry (James Lynch) Aspects of syndicalism in Spain, Sweden & U.S.A. (Philip Holgate).

ANARCHY 3: Moving with the times … but not in step; A notebook in South Africa (Maurice Goldman) Africa and the future (Jeremy Westall) Culture and community (Nicolas Walter) Removal of guilt (Anthony Weaver).

ANARCHY 4: Where the shoe pinches: a discussion of “de-institutionalisation” (Colin Ward) Conflicting strains in anarchist thought (George Molnar) Africa and the future: a comment (J.E.)

ANARCHY 5: Spain: the revolution of 1936 (articles and reviews by V.R.; Marie Louise Berneri; Philip Holgate; Gaston Leval; H. E. Kaminski; on the revolution and the Spanish collectives).